Home

Choose us to fix your precious Apple device.

Click on a graphic below or a link to go directly to your model!

Choose a model below.

iPod Battery and iPhone Battery FAQ

Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about iPod and iPhone batteries

Hot news

07/11/08 – Apple’s new iPhone 3G battery is NOT soldered to the motherboard!
04/10/08 – Third-partyiPod battery replacement provider iPodJuice.com dominates the ipod battery space by lowering prices.
02/06/08 – New MacBook Air battery replacement videos surface (good news: they’re replaceable!)
07/24/07 – Apple has announced AppleCare Protection Plan for iPhone for $69, which extends iPhone warranty coverage,including battery, to two years.
07/19/07 – iPodJuice.com has announced the first third-party iPhone battery replacement (press release).
06/29/07 – Apple has announced an out-of-warranty battery replacement service for iPhone. iPhone battery questions will be answered here as information becomes available.

See this table to determine which model of iPod you have.



iPod and General Battery Questions

Q: Is the iPod battery replaceable?
A: Yes. Apple has an official out-of-warranty battery replacement program for $59 + $6.95 shipping in the United States (see also: Europe and Canada pricing). The program requires that you send in your iPod (any model), and Apple will replace the battery and return it to you for $59 plus shipping and handling. Technically, Apple actually replaces your whole iPod with an equivalent new model or factory-refurbished model in a brand new enclosure, with its own 90-day service warranty; if the iPod was previously engraved by Apple, it will be engraved again. AppleCare programs for iPod are also available in some markets outside the US, and are expected soon in other markets. 3rd-party ipod battery companies provide better batteries and faster service than Apple. The replacement program is now also available on-demand via Apple Retail locations; simply bring your existing iPod and you can walk out with a replacement iPod. One sync with iTunes gets all of your music and video back onto the iPod. Any other data should be backed up before replacement. The iPod Out-of-warranty Battery Replacement Program is only required for iPods that are no longer covered by the warranty or AppleCare Protection Plan for iPod. 3rd-party ipod battery companies provide better batteries and faster service than Apple.

Q: How do I contact Apple for service?
A: You may contact Apple in any of the following ways:

  • By telephone in the US: 1-800-APL-CARE
  • By visiting any Apple Retail location
  • By visiting any Apple Authorized Service Provider
  • By using the online iPod Service Request web site

Keep in mind that 3rd-party ipod battery companies provide better batteries and faster service than Apple.

Q: Is the iPod battery user-replaceable?
A1: Yes and no. The iPod’s case is not designed to be opened, so, in that respect, it’s not what would generally be referred to as “user-replaceable”. However, with the right set of tools and instructions from one of the following vendors, you can replace the battery yourself and avoid all the hassle by going through Apple:

  • iPodJuice.com has high-quality iPod batteries (starting at US$25; all iPods; do-it-yourself and mail-in) * Recommended
  • iPod mini battery kits from ipodminibattery.com (US$35; 2G, 3G, and iPod mini; do-it-yourself)
  • theipodbatteryunplugged.com (no kits, but great information, and a funny site.
  • Maroon Macaw (starting at $45 and up; poor tools, vague directions)
  • Kelly Coconut (starting at $50; no support, no return policy)
  • Short Last Titan (starting at $55; poor support, cheap tools, so-so batteries)
  • Apple Computer (starting at $59 plus shipping; have to send it in, refurbished iPod back)

A2: TechTV’s Call for Help has a story discussing and demonstrating replacing iPod battery.
A3: Popular Science HOW 2.0 also has an article about replacing the battery.

Q: What is the iPod warranty? Does it cover the battery? Is there any way to extend it?
A1: The iPod warranty is one year. It does cover the battery.
A2: You can extend the iPod’s warranty, including battery coverage, to two years with AppleCare Protection Plan for iPod. Numerous retailers, such as Best Buy, CompUSA, Circuit City, etc., also have very inexpensive extended warranty coverage available for iPod. Often these plans simply replace the product with a comparable new unit.

Q: Does Apple think the iPod is disposable?
A: No. The iPod is engineered to last; Apple is consistently ranked number one in product quality and support by leading consumer groups, such as Consumer Reports. Apple also has out-of-warranty service and extended warranty options. Apple has officially stated that the iPod is designed to last “for years”.

Q: I heard that the iPod battery only lasts 18 months, and then you have to buy a new iPod! Is that true?
A1: NO! The vast majority of even the earliest iPods, now over five years old, continue to function just fine. Some iPods, however, based on age and usage style, will have more battery degradation than others. Lithium ion batteries are only good for 300 to 500 charge/discharge cycles (more). For this reason, certain customers’ usage patterns may cause the batteries to degrade, or fail, sooner than others.
A2: If the battery does fail, and the iPod is no longer under its original one year warranty or $59 AppleCare Protection Plan for iPod, or any of numerous third party service plans, you don’t have to buy a new iPod. You may replace the battery yourself for as little as $2, have a third party replace it, or have Apple perform the replacement for $59.

Q: Will the iPod battery degrade over time?
A: Yes. Over time, the battery will not hold the same amount of charge as when it was new. This is natural, and is true of all lithium ion batteries. This slow degradation will not affect, or be noticed by, most users during the life of their iPod. However, based on usage, environmental factors, and many other variables, some heavy users may notice a greater degradation than others. It is important to understand that this is the exact same degradation that would occur with any lithium ion battery used in any laptop, cell phone, portable music player, etc., and is not unique to the iPod. For more information, see this page.

Q: How much playing time should I get out of my iPod battery? (What is the playing time for different iPod models?)
A1: See this detailed table for battery capacities and playing times for different iPod models.
A2: Apple’s specifications specify a battery or iPod mini battery life of 10 hours for the 1st and 2nd generation iPod, 8 hours for the 3rd generation iPod battery and 1st generation iPod mini, 12 hours for the 4th generation iPod and iPod shuffle, 15 hours for iPod photo, 18 hours for the 2nd generation iPod mini, 14 hours for the iPod nano battery and 30GB iPod video, and 20 hours for the 60GB iPod video. Many factors can, of course, influence this. Under good conditions, you should indeed get around the specified hours of battery life on a new iPod. This amount varies with age, usage style, and other factors, such as music encoding format, backlight use, etc. To get the most out of your battery, follow these tips:

  • iPod: How to Get the Most Out of the Battery (Apple)
  • iPod: About Battery Care (Apple)
  • A battery which only lasts for half, or less, of the specified time may be considered to be defective under warranty terms. However, you can follow the steps in this document to test your battery life in a controlled way.

Available iPod Battery Replacement Service Providers:

Apple Computer iPodJuice.com (recommended) Auction Sites Cost: $60 plus shipping starting at $25 market Do-It-Yourself: n/a Yes Yes Battery Life: same as original battery plays longer than original battery same as original battery Warranty: 1 year 10 years n/a Keep Same iPod?: No (refurbished iPod given back) Yes Yes Contact #: 1-800-APL-CARE 1-800-809-8133 / 210-568-7473 n/a Kit Notes: n/a (have to send it in for replacement) includes better tools, color instructions, technical support flimsy tools, no instructions, no technical support Turnaround: 2 – 3 weeks same-day shipping varies from vendor Website URL: www.apple.com www.ipodjuice.com

Q: What does “1G”, “2G”, or “first generation”, “second generation”, etc., mean?
A: This refers to the “generation” of the iPod. For example, “1G” is “first generation”. Each generation represents a certain model of iPod, with a different set of features, size, appearance, and so on. Each generation of iPod also has different specifications.

Q: How can I tell which model of iPod I have?
A: See this table to determine your model of iPod. Also, see How can I tell if my iPod is under warranty? for a method of determining the model of your iPod from its serial number.

Q: When does Apple consider the battery defective for purposes of warranty replacement?
A: According to the AppleCare Protection Plan Terms and Conditions, the iPod battery is defective when “capacity of the covered iPod battery to hold an electrical charge has depleted fifty (50%) percent or more from its original specification, after being fully charged and the covered iPod playing music with all settings reset.” Apple’s Battery Replacement page says, “Your one-year warranty includes replacement coverage for a defective battery. You can extend your coverage to two years from the date of your iPod purchase with the AppleCare Protection Plan for iPod. During the plan’s coverage period, Apple will replace the battery if it drops below 50% of its original capacity. If it is out of warranty, Apple offers a battery replacement for $59, plus $6.95 shipping, subject to local tax. Apple disposes of your battery in an environmentally friendly manner.” Knowledge Base article 61475 also says: “If you still feel that you are getting significantly less than the expected amount of play from the battery, you can arrange for service on the iPod Service Request site (http://depot.info.apple.com/ipod/).” Knowledge Base article 61475 gives a controlled procedure to follow to test battery life.

Q: How can I tell if my iPod is under warranty or AppleCare?
A: Visit Apple Support. A little more than halfway down the page in the right column, you will see a section entitled “About Your Support Coverage”. Enter the serial number of your iPod here. It will tell you whether your iPod is under warranty, and will also tell you which specific model of iPod you have.

Q: What kind of battery does the iPod use?
A: The iPod uses the latest lithium ion battery technology from the leading battery manufacturers, such as Sony and Sanyo. See this table for more information on battery capacities on various iPod models. (The first and second generation iPods use a Sony UP325385 A4H 3.7V 1230mAh lithium ion polymer battery. The third generation iPods use a 3.7V 630mAh lithium ion battery. The first generation replace iPod mini battery uses a Sanyo EC003 3.7V 400mAh lithium ion battery.)

Q: Why didn’t Apple use better ipod or iPod nano batteries?
A: Apple uses the best lithium ion battery technology available from leading battery manufacturers. This is the best, most cost effective battery technology available given the requirements of the device. The lithium ion batteries that Apple uses are no different than the lithium ion batteries used by any other manufacturer, on products from portable music players, to laptops, to wireless phones. The battery should last most normal users the life of the product (several years).

Q: How can I get the most out of the iPod battery? (Or get more out of it if it seems degraded?)
A1: Follow these tips:

  • iPod: How to Get the Most Out of the Battery (Apple)
  • iPod: About Battery Care (Apple)
  • How to prolong lithium-based batteries (Battery University)

There are even external battery packs available that take standard AA batteries.
A2: One very important thing (covered in the above tips, but is important enough to repeat) is to ensure you have the latest version of the iPod software, sometimes called “firmware”, on the iPod itself. The latest version of iPod software can always be found here.
A3: Some users of early iPods whose batteries appeared to be severely degraded have been able to restore them by following these simple instructions.

Q: What is the best way to handle charging/discharging/storage of lithium ion batteries?
A1: How to prolong lithium-based batteries
A2: Lithium ion batteries are good for 300-500 charge/discharge cycles. A “charge/discharge” cycle generally consists of an iPod extended battery charging period, and an extended discharging period. A quick charge, listening for 30 minutes, and charging again, for example, does not constitute a full “charge/discharge cycle”, but could rather be considered a portion of one. Also, many, many factors affect how much you get out of each charge, as well as how long the battery will last overall. The main factors include charging patterns, the routine amount of discharge (i.e., Do you use it until it dies? Use it for an hour or two and recharge?), temperature, storage, usage frequency, etc. Lithium ion batteries do not take kindly to frequent full or complete discharges. When possible, the optimal usage pattern – for any lithium ion battery – is a partial discharge, followed by recharging. A partial discharge can be anything less than a full discharge. However, an occasional full discharge is desirable (e.g., once every 30 charges) to calibrate the battery. Lithium ion batteries do not significantly degrade, or develop “memory”, even if charged at irregular intervals; irregular charging is acceptable. An iPod can also safely be attached to external power for extended periods of time. (For extremely extended periods of time, such as months, the battery will essentially be the same as if it were in “storage”; lithium ion batteries do not store well for extended periods of time at full charge. However, there is no way around this under these circumstances.) When possible, always use the AC adapter (or vehicle adapter) for extended charging, not a FireWire cable attached to a computer. It is generally recommended to store lithium ion batteries at about 40% charge. However, the iPod draws power even when it is off, meaning that it will soon deplete any charge that it has. If you will be storing your iPod for an extended period of time (i.e., weeks to months), it is recommended to store the unit in a cool place; charge level is unimportant, as the charge will be completely depleted after several days. The most harmful combination for storage is full charge at high temperature (i.e., in a hot car). For more information on rechargeable batteries in general, see:

  • Battery University
  • Batteries in a Portable World: A Handbook on Rechargeable Batteries for Non-Engineers
  • How Batteries Work
  • Lithium ion battery article at Wikipedia
  • An overview of lithium ion battery technology

Q: If my battery dies, will I lose all of my music?
A: No. The iPod stores all of its music on a hard disk. If the battery is drained completely, or even removed, all of the music on the iPod will remain intact. Additionally, you still have all of your music in the iTunes music library on your computer. If you need a new battery and use Apple’s replacement service, Apple will send you a new or refurbished iPod. Since the replacement iPod no longer has your music, you will simply need to resynchronize it with your iTunes library on your computer, which will only take a few minutes. All of your music should always be in your iTunes library on your computer, and your iTunes library should be backed up. If you replace your battery yourself or use one of the non-Apple replacement services, all of the music will remain intact on the iPod.

Q: Is it okay to leave the iPod in the dock, or otherwise attached to external power, for extended periods of time?
A1: Yes. The iPod’s circuitry will no longer charge the battery once it is determined to be full, even if the iPod is still attached to external power.
A2: This can also be a more complicated issue. Lithium ion batteries age faster when stored at full charge. If your usage of the iPod consists almost exclusively of use while plugged in for extended periods of time such as weeks or months, and very limited usage from the battery, the battery is essentially always in a charged state. A fully charged lithium ion battery ages at a faster rate than a lithium ion battery at the optimum storage capacity of approximately 40%. However, keeping an iPod battery near this optimum storage capacity can prove difficult to manage. A lithium ion battery also ages from use, as well as from storage, so the aging effects of constant use of the battery in order to keep the charge closer to 40%, versus constant use while attached to external power, come close to being even.

Q: Why doesn’t Apple make the battery easily replaceable? Or use different batteries, like AA?
A: Because if they did either, the size of the batteries and/or the access panels and mechanisms required to access the battery would make the unit significantly larger than it is, likely by several millimeters in thickness at a minimum, and would also affect other dimensions, as well as weight. It was an engineering decision to use an integrated battery; if it were not integrated, the unit would not have the small, sleek form factor that makes it so attractive in the first place. Additionally, the iPod’s battery is indeed replaceable, as has been discussed above.

Q: Is there any way to use an external battery pack, or standard AA batteries?
A: Yes. Belkin makes an external battery pack for the “dockable” iPod that takes 4 standard AA batteries. Battery Tech also makes a high-capacity external rechargable battery. Big Wave Power makes a universal high capacity external battery and charging pack. There is also a do-it-yourself kit that allows you to run and/or charge your iPod from standard AA batteries

Q: No one else uses an integrated battery!
A: Dell’s DJ portable music player uses an integrated, non-user-replaceable lithium ion battery, just like the iPod. Many other music players, from vendors like Gateway, Samsung, iRiver, and Rio – all viewed as the competitive comparisons to iPod – also use integrated lithium ion batteries sealed inside the enclosure.

Q: Apple only released their battery replacement service because of all the bad publicity from iPod’s Dirty Secret.
A: While often claimed, this is not true. Apple released the battery replacement program November 14, 2003. The domain ipodsdirtysecret.com was only registered onNovember 20, 2003, and started being heavily publicized on November 21, 2003. Additionally, Apple had been planning the AppleCare programs for months – these types of service programs don’t just happen overnight – before Casey Neistat even had his first contact with Apple. The video campaign had nothing to do with Apple’s rollout of the battery replacement program. The true value of this video is debatable.

Q: Is there something wrong with the iPod? It shouldn’t have these problems!
A: No, there is nothing wrong with it. It is not fundamentally flawed in any way. Apple products have the lowest incidence of repairs, highest quality, and best support among all manufacturers. An Apple industry news site, MacInTouch, recently conducted an iPod reliability survey, showing iPods in general to have a very low incidence of failures (the survey includes failures due to dropping, spills, abuse, and so on). Lithium ion batteries have a finite lifetime, and Apple has in place a mechanism to replace them, if needed. The vast majority of iPod owners will never experience any issues with the battery during the lifetime of the product, even under heavy, frequent usage. There is a reason the iPod is the number one portable music player with over 92% of the hard drive-based music player market, and the most desirable. There are engineering tradeoffs for each design decision made; Apple is continuously working to make the iPod better. Other manufacturers of small, best-of-breed hard drive-based players also use integrated, lithium ion batteries in the same way.

Q: I’m having some other problem with my iPod that I don’t think it should be having.
A: Many problems can be solved by following troubleshooting steps (resources listed below), contacting Apple, or asking for help in an online forum. While Apple products statistically have the least problems, an iPod is like any electronic device, and as such, things can go wrong with it.

Q: Is there a place I can take an iPod I no longer want for safe disposal?
A: Apple offers a free recycling program for iPod. Customers can bring iPods they no longer want to any Apple Retial Store in the US for free environmentally friendly disposal, and will receive a 10 percent discount on the purchase of a new iPod that day. iPods received for recycling in the US are processed domestically and no hazardous material is shipped overseas. More details about Apple’s worldwide recycling programs are available at http://apple.com/environment/.

Q: What if I need to repair my iPod? Is it worth doing it?
A: There are several ipod repair companies out there, and you will just have to contact one of them with the model iPod you have, as well as a brief description of the kind of problem you are having. More often than not these apple ipod repair companies can give you an idea of what the main issue probably is and an estimate of how much this might cost. Be sure to back up your data before having your iPod repaired, a good program to back up your photos is CopyTrans photo software.

Back to top


iPhone battery questions

Q: Is the iPhone battery replaceable?
A: Yes. Apple has an official out-of-warranty battery replacement program for $79 + $6.95 shipping. Currently, the official battery replacement service for iPhone batteries requires sending the iPhone to Apple, as with iPod. Apple will provide a loaner AppleCare Service iPhone (“AppleCare Service Phone”) while your iPhone is being repaired or serviced for a fee of $29. Such service will be possible via any any Apple Retail location, an Apple Authorized Service Provider, or via an online service request process. Apple actually replaces your whole iPhone with an equivalent new model or factory-refurbished model in a brand new enclosure, with its own 90-day service warranty. Similar procedures will be developed for worldwide markets. There will likely be several other do-it-yourself or mail-in methods of replacing the battery when necessary, as with iPod. More information will be posted as it becomes available. This service will likely also be available as an on-demand service via Apple Retail stores, as with iPod; you can walk out the same day with a replacement iPhone. The SIM card containing the phone number and identity is simply moved from your existing iPhone to the replacement iPhone, and one sync with iTunes gets all of your contacts, music, data, and anything else on the iPhone back to the way it was. The iPhone Out-of-warranty Battery Replacement Program is only required for iPhones that are no longer covered by the warranty or AppleCare Protection Plan for iPhone. Since iPhone was released on June 29, 2007, and has a one year warranty, June 29, 2008, is the earliest date this service would be needed.

Q: Is the iPhone battery user-replaceable?
A: iPhone is sealed and is not “user-servicable”, making iPhone similar to iPod in this respect. Battery replacement is available through Apple, and third party and do-it-yourself battery replacements for iPhone are also available.

Q: What is the iPhone warranty? Does it cover the battery? Is there any way to extend it?
A1: The iPhone warranty is one year. It does cover the battery.
A2: You can extend the iPhone’s warranty, including battery coverage, to two years with AppleCare Protection Plan for iPhone for $69.

Q: When does Apple consider the battery defective for purposes of warranty replacement?
A: Apple’s Battery Replacement page says, “Your one-year warranty includes replacement coverage for a defective battery. You can extend your coverage to two years from the date of your iPhone purchase with the AppleCare Protection Plan for iPhone, which is expected to be available in summer 2007. During the plan’s coverage period, Apple will replace the battery if it drops below 50% of its original capacity. If it is out of warranty, Apple offers a battery replacement for $79, plus $6.95 shipping, subject to local tax. Apple disposes of your battery in an environmentally friendly manner.

Q: When did Apple release the iPhone out-of-warranty battery replacement program?
A: The evening of June 29, 2007, the same day as the US launch of iPhone. The iPhone Out-of-warranty Battery Replacement Program is only required for iPhones that are no longer covered by the warranty or AppleCare Protection Plan for iPhone. Since iPhone was released on June 29, 2007, and has a one year warranty, June 29, 2008, is the earliest date this service would be needed.

Q: Can I receive a loaner iPhone if I need to send my iPhone in for battery replacement or other service?
A: Yes. Apple will provide a loaner AppleCare Service iPhone (“AppleCare Service Phone”) while your iPhone is being repaired or serviced for a fee of $29. The loaner iPhone can simply be synced with iTunes in the same way as your own iPhone, and will work and act exactly like your own iPhone, with your own telephone number and all of your contacts, songs, photos, and other data, while your iPhone is being serviced. When you receive your replacement iPhone, you simply sync with iTunes again. Any changes in the meantime will be reflected when you synchronize. See Apple’s iPhone Service FAQ for more information about the AppleCare Service Phone.

Q: What kind of battery does the iPhone use?
A: The iPhone uses a lithium ion battery, as do nearly all mobile phones and portable devices. On-line dissassembly sites revealed that iPhone uses a 3.7V 1400 mAh Lithium Ion Polymer battery, with manufacturer part number L1S1376APPC, and Apple service part number 616-0290. Another site revealed a similar 3.7V 1400 mAh Lithium Ion Polymer battery, but with manufacturer part number P11G59-01-S01 and Apple service part number 616-0291. The differences, if any, between these batteries are not known at this time.

Q: How long does the iPhone battery last?
A: The iPhone specifications state:

  • Up to 8 hours talk time
  • Up to 250 hours standby
  • Up to 6 hours internet use
  • Up to 7 hours video playback
  • Up to 24 hours audio playback

A press release has some additional information and comparisons about iPhone battery.

Q: I heard the iPhone battery “only lasts 40 minutes.” Is that true?
A: No. This rumor came from John Dvorak, who openly admits to trolling Apple users to get attention for his articles. He provided no proof, and cited an anonymous person at Cingular who claimed they were testing the phone. iPhone, like many other products in its class, other similar smartphones, and so on, uses a standard lithium ion battery. While manufacturers routinely state iPod battery life specifications under optimal conditions, reviews have found that actual battery performance under good conditions is not significantly different from what Apple has already stated in the specifications.

Q: I heard that the iPhone can only be charged 300 times and then the battery dies. Is that true?
A: No. Lithium-ion batteries are good for 300 to 500 charge/discharge cycles. Some interpret this as meaning that if an iPhone is charged daily, it could need a new battery in as little as 300 days. That is incorrect. First, a partial charge does not represent a full charge/discharge cycle. For example, if an iPhone’s battery level is at 75% and it is charged, that can be thought to account for a quarter of a single discharge cycle. Second, a lithium ion battery gradually degrades; it will not simply stop functioning after a certain number of cycles. Apple’s official position is that the battery will retain 80% of its life after 300 to 400 cycles. After a certain point, some customers may begin to feel it is time to consider to change iPod battery. However, for many customers, that time will not come for at least two years or more, at which point many customers will already have purchased a new handset. For others, iPod replacement battery options are available.

Q: When will more detailed iPhone battery specifications and performance data become available?
A: Apple will likely not provide additional specifications or performance data beyond what has already been stated in the iPhone specifications. Research firms and third parties hoping to provide replacement batteries have already disassembled iPhone, determining the type of battery used.

iFixit has posted an illustrated disassembly guide for iPhone, which shows the battery and other internal components.

Q: Why didn’t Apple make the iPhone battery easily user-accessible?
A: Neither Apple nor AT&T/Cingular have made any statements on this topic. However, it is again an engineering decision, as with the iPod. On the iPod, the decision wasn’t made for “planned obsolescense”, to force people into buying new iPods, or to make people buy “overpriced” batteries, as there are numerous ways to replace the battery from many sources, including Apple, for as little as $20. In the case of the iPod, it was an engineering decision, allowing them to make the device smaller, thinner, and lighter than competitive devices, and not covered with access doors, by eliminating traditional mechanisms and internal design required for “user-accessible” battery access.

In the case of iPhone, it has been done for the same reasons: iPhone is the thinnest and lightest phone anywhere near its class, while also being a much more powerful device, with more functionality and capability in the same size than other devices on the market. This would likely be seen as a very reasonable tradeoff for iPhone’s target market. iPhone is also more likely to be docked and/or connected to a computer via USB or attached to a powered dock for music playback, and would thus also be charging while connected. This is also seen as another differentiation from how many other phones, even in the smartphone/PDA class, are used. One other difference with the mobile phone market, even with higher end phones, is that many customers obtain a new phone when the contract is renewed because of the carrier subsidy for a new phone or a desire for the latest device features, often before a new iPod battery is needed.

Q: Will higher capacity batteries be available for iPhone?
A: As with iPod, different options for batteries from third parties will likely become available. Apple is very likely already using the highest capacity batteries available in the size and form factor used in the iPhone. However, if improvements in battery manufacturing yield improvements that were not yet available in older iterations of iPhone, it is likely that third parties could offer higher capacity batteries for iPhone in the future. This was the same case with iPod. Also, external, slim batteries that cover most or all of the back of the phone will also likely become available. Such external batteries would add a small amount of overall thickness, but would conform to the iPhone style and shape while greatly increasing battery capacity. Similar batteries for other smartphone/PDA class devices increase overall battery capacity by twice or more. Some vendors already offer iPhone battery replacements.

Because iPhone also uses the same dock connector as iPod, the wide range of external battery packs, power adapters and ipod chargers (wall, vehicle, aircraft), and other power accessories for iPod are also already compatible with iPhone! Many new vehicles are also available with optional iPod dock connectors. These same connectors with work with, and charge, iPhone as well.

Q: Can I use my iPod external battery pack, power adapter, wall outlet iPod charger, or other power accessory with iPhone?
A: Yes! iPhone also uses the same 30-pin dock connector as iPod, and the wide range of external battery packs, power adapters, wall chargers, vehicle chargers, aircraft chargers, USB and FIreWire charging cables, and many other Apple and third party power accessories for iPod are already compatible with iPhone!

Many new vehicles as well as aftermarket automotive audio equipment are also available with optional iPod dock connectors. These same connectors with work with, and charge, iPhone as well, in addition to allowing music playback and control functionality just as with iPod. Since iPhone is a wireless device, it may cause interference with some iPod accessories; for this reason, look for the “Works with iPhone” label when you buy new iPod or iPhone accessories.

Back to top


Resources

  • iPod and iPhone Battery and Power Specifications, iPod and iPhone Model Range table

Apple iPod

  • Apple iPod
  • Apple iPod software updates
  • Apple iPod FAQ
  • Apple iPod Battery FAQ
  • Apple iPod Battery Service FAQ
  • Apple iPod battery troubleshooting steps
  • Apple Batteries
  • Replace iPod Battery
  • Apple iPod Batteries
  • Apple iPod Support
  • AppleCare replacement iPod Battery (US$59; official Apple battery replacement for all iPods)
  • AppleCare Protection Plan for iPod(US$59; extends warranty from 1 year to 2 years and phone support from 90 days to 2 years)

Apple iPhone

  • Apple iPhone
  • Apple iPhone Service FAQ
  • Apple iPhone Battery Service FAQ
  • Apple iPhone battery troubleshooting steps
  • Apple iPhone Support
  • Apple iPhone Batteries

Third party

  • iPodJuice.com (starting at US$25; all iPods; do-it-yourself and mail-in)
  • iPod mini batteries and other iPod models from ipodminibattery.com (US$29; 2G, 3G, and Apple iPod mini battery; do-it-yourself)

Other

  • A real iPod battery story on what may (or may NOT) be wrong with your iPod battery
  • iPod and iPhone Battery and Power Specifications, iPod and iPhone Model Range table
  • TechTV iPod mini battery replacement story

This site in the news
MTV, New York Times St Paul Pioneer Press, Numerous articles in The Guardian, The Times, Macworld UK.

Comments, questions, additions, feedback?

info@ipodbatteryfaq.comStill have questions? Email us for more info.

Back to top

Click now for iPod mini Battery replacement kits and more!

Apple Certified Techs Better Business Bureau New York Times Comodo Secure UPS USPS FedEx